Proton's radius to be measured by MUSE Project (2015-2016)
Date: Wednesday, February 18, 2015 @ 00:44:52 EST
Topic: Science


From: wladimirguglinski
Subject: the puzzle of the proton's radius
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 16:09:59 -0200

To: Dr. Randolf Pohl, Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics, Garching, Germany; Dr. Aldo Antognini, Institute for Particle Physics (IPP), ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; Prof. Dr. Theodor W. Hänsch, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich; Dr. Franz Kottmann, Laboratory for Particle Physics, Paul Scherrer Institut Villigen PSI, Switzerland; Prof. Dr. Thomas Graf, Universität Stuttgart, Institut für Strahlwerkzeuge, Stuttgart, Germany; Karsten Schuhmann, Institute for Particle Physics (IPP), ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; Dr. Paul Knowles, Département de physique, Université de Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland

Dear Professors

Regarding the puzzle of the proton's radius, in the page of the Paul Scherrer Institute it is written the following:


Very interesting proposals explain the discrepancies by physics beyond the standard model. Other explanations suggest a proton structure of higher complexity than assumed today which only reveals itself under the influence of the heavy muon.
http://www.psi.ch/media/proton-size-puzzle-reinforced


A model of proton with higher complexity is proposed in the book Quantum Ring Theory-QRT, published in 2006 by the Bauu Institute Press.

According to the model proposed in QRT, the rotation of the three quarks of the proton induces a flux composed by gravitons with the speed "c" of the light.  In the book it is named flux n(o).
The rotation of the three quarks take the shape of a ring, and the flux n(o) crosses the ring formed by the three quarks.

The flux n(o) becomes stronger when the proton interacts with other particles, because there is an overlap between the flux n(o) of the proton and the flux n(o) of the other particle.  A free proton has the radius in order of 0,8 fm, as measured by the experiments of proton-electron scattering.  The shrinkage in the proton's radius depends on the mass of the other particle, because the intensity of the total flux n(o) crossing the ring of the proton depends on the mass of the other particle.

Therefore, when the proton interacts with heavier particles, the flux n(o) becomes stronger, and this is the reason why the radius of the proton has shrinkage.

In the article ANOMALOUS MASS OF THE PROTON published in the book QRT, it is calculated that the radius of the proton within the nuclei is 0,275 fm.  From this radius of the proton it is calculated the electric quadrupole moment of the deuteron, and the result is the same obtained from experiments.
The paper ANOMALOUS MASS OF THE PROTON is also published in the blog Journal of Nuclear Physics:
http://www.journal-of-nuclear-physics.com/?p=516

As the muon is very heavier than the electron, then from this higher complexity model of proton we have to expect that in proton-muon scattering the experiments will measure a proton radius very shorter than 0,8 fm. I expect a a proton's radius between 0,3 fm and 0,6 fm.

In the case the experiments to be carried out by the MUSE project confirm my prediction getting a radius between 0,3 fm and 0,6 fm, I hope the theorists will realize the need of considering seriously my heavier complexity model of the proton, formed by a flux of gravitons crossing the ring formed by the rotation of the three quarks.


Regards
Wladimir Guglinski





This article comes from ZPEnergy.com
http://www.zpenergy.com

The URL for this story is:
http://www.zpenergy.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=3603